Israeli Couscous with Sautéd Squash, Roasted Tomatoes & Garlic

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I like comfort food.  Which usually means a mouthful of pasta.  I especially like it when it is small enough that I can simply scoop spoonfuls into my mouth.  Gosh, I hope that doesn't sound gross. But it is quite satisfying.  Which is why I love creating salads that fit that agenda.  As with my Orzo Salad, this Israeli Couscous dish has that same mouthfeel.  Flavor in every bite filled with the comfort of a pasta.  Small enough that it's easy to spoon, swallow and spoon again.  Oh, yeah, don't forget to chew.

I created this dish for a Ladies' Lunch for my Mom and the women's group at her condo.  They were gracious enough to allow me to cater the lunch for them, and I had a blast doing it.  I will post more about the entire meal but for now, let's focus on spooning some of this salad for your next lunch, dinner side dish or BBQ party.  When I came up with idea it was to satisfy what I thought the women would enjoy as well as a dish that would be easy to make given all the other items I was making.  What I didn't even realize at the time was that this Israeli Couscous plays off the same idea as my Garlic Rice with Sautéd Zucchini & Tomatoes.  I found that recipe as I was writing this one so I could share other zucchini ideas. And there it was, along with several others.

Apparently, there are a million ways to serve up zucchini.  So here's a quick reminder of a few I have experimented with and achieved success.  Try them out while the weather is zucchini friendly.
Zucchini Crudo with Shaved Parmigiano & Mint Oil
Zucchini Orzo Pie
Zucchini Carpaccio
Balsamic Bathed Carrots Wrapped with Zucchini
An Asian Twist to Zucchini Ribbons

Now back to the main attraction. This is one of those dishes that you can literally being cooking, cutting, sautéing all at the same time.  A multitasking wonder. So I have written the instructions in a way to be most efficient. 

Ingredients

1.5 cups Israeli Couscous
1 large zucchini, cubed
1-2 small yellow squash, cubed
1 medium shallot, diced
1 pint grape tomatoes, oven roasted
4-5 whole garlic cloves
2-3 T basil, chiffonade
1 c olive Oil
1 t coarse salt
1/2 t pepper
*Note: You can alter the couscous to veg ratio if you like more of one.  Totally up to you.

Slice the squashes lengthwise first. Then strips, then cubes.

Slice the squashes lengthwise first. Then strips, then cubes.

 

Instructions

1. Roast the grape tomatoes in 1/2 c olive oil with whole cloves of garlic.  Refer to the oil roasted recipe in my post The  Great Tomato Caper.

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2.  While the tomatoes roast, cut the zucchini, yellow squash and shallots and sauté them separately in oil. Season with salt and pepper, adding half the shallots to each batch, once they are partially cooked.  You don't want to add the shallots first as they will burn.

Nice little cubes all the same size so you get a piece in every spoonful.

Nice little cubes all the same size so you get a piece in every spoonful.

Zucchini cubed up

Zucchini cubed up

3. While the squashes are sautéing, cook the Israeli Couscous as you would any type of pasta, in a large pot of salted boiling water.  Cook until al dente.  Drain and set aside in a serving bowl, drizzle with a little olive oil so it doesn't stick and let cool.

Gorgeous pearls of pasta

Gorgeous pearls of pasta

4.  Once the tomatoes are done, remove the garlic from their skins and mash them with a fork and course salt.  Add 1/4 c olive oil, pepper to taste and whisk together.

Grapes tomatoes oven roasted in luscious oil with roasted garlic.

Grapes tomatoes oven roasted in luscious oil with roasted garlic.

Sweet and tender garlic.

Sweet and tender garlic.

Smash to create a paste.

Smash to create a paste.

5. It is best to mix the roasted garlic oil into the couscous while it is still warm so the flavors absorb, but you can mix it at room temperature, too. Be sure to thoroughly incorporate.
6. Chiffonade the basil (cutting them in strips) and add to the couscous.
7. Then add some of the juices from the roasted tomatoes, the tomatoes and sautéed squashed. Gently mix until combined.  Serve room temperature.

A bowl of goodness that is pure pleasure to eat spoonful after spoonful.

A bowl of goodness that is pure pleasure to eat spoonful after spoonful.

This is one of those dishes that is both hearty but light at the same time.  The couscous is a pasta so it does do the job of satisfyingly fill you up, but the lightness of the veggies make it feel summertime fresh, especially served room temperature or even chilled.  

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I made this out of love.
Love of pasta.
Love for my Mom.
Love to share with others.

 

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Amuse Bouche...That's not English, Right?

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Oh the French, they do give us some wonderful food and great phrases.  And the one that starts it all off is the Amuse-bouche.  The literal translation is mouth amuser.  In a restaurant, this is the appetizer before the appetizer. Not ordered from the menu by a customer, but given as a complimentary single bite from the chef to start your meal.  It is meant to amuse the mouth. Get it ready for the meal. Whet the appetite and get the patron excited for what is to come. 

Only the French would think of amusing your mouth. I dare say that the Italians aren't into amusing so much, but straight up satisfying from the onset.  I do love the idea of tickling the tongue with a little nosh to get you primed.  A little food foreplay, wouldn't you say?

This practice doesn't need to be limited to restaurants. As JuanCarlos and I prepare for a trip to France, I reasoned that this was a perfect time to honor their tradition and share some ideas on the subject. So go ahead,  treat your guests to an Amuse Bouche.  You like them, don't you?  So amuse their bouche.

Remember this is meant to be just one little bite not a full blown appetizer. However,  any of these can be an appetizer. (Just love when things can do double duty).  An amuse bouche can range from the elaborate to a very simple offering. 

Here are six offerings, each providing the all important combination of salty, sweet, tang, texture to get the mouth party off to the races.

Goat Cheese & Nut Topped Grapes

These are an easy, pop in your mouth kind of bite.  Refreshing and textural, and create the "more please" effect. 

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  • Use the stemmed end as the base, as this will help the grape stand up.

  • Slice a tiny bit off the top of the grape to have a level landing spot for a dollop of goat cheese.

  • Using a small spoon gather 1/2 tsp of room temp goat cheese and place it atop the grape. (I use my clean fingers to create a little dollop)

  • Dip it in the crushed/ground nuts (such as pistachios or a mix of pecans, walnuts or whatever nut you like). These can be made ahead of time, but save the nut dipping til just before serving. You don't want the nuts to get soggy in the refrigerate. NOBODY likes soggy nuts.

Prep yourself with everything at the ready. Look how simple this is. 3 ingredients. 3 steps: Slice, dollop and dip

Prep yourself with everything at the ready. Look how simple this is. 3 ingredients. 3 steps: Slice, dollop and dip

You can store in the fridge like this with plastic wrap

You can store in the fridge like this with plastic wrap

Dip right before serving.

Dip right before serving.

Salmon Topped Cucumber or Apple

Alright, this may be two bites, but satisfying ones, for sure. These deliver a creamy texture paired with a cool crisp  and salty bite.

Salmon / cream cheese roll up a top a cucumber slice.

Salmon / cream cheese roll up a top a cucumber slice.

  • Cut a 1/2" slice of cucumber.

  • Pipe a dollop of soften cream cheese on top.

  • Place a small piece of smoked salmon laid down in a crossed fashion.

  • Pipe another dollop of cream cheese in the center and top with capers and dill.
    (You can also use the Salmon Roll method. On a large piece of plastic wrap lay the salmon down, making sure to overlay slightly. Spread softened cream cheese on top. Sprinkle with capers, then roll up like a sushi roll, Refrigerate. Once chilled, cut into 1/2” rounds placing atop each cucumber slice. Adorn with dill, as seen above.)

Refreshing on a slice of apple. This is from my   Lox on What?   idea.

Refreshing on a slice of apple. This is from my Lox on What? idea.

Pea Soup Shooter

A chilled, tall drink of spring. (I have not tried these recipes but wanted to provide a few links for your reference.)
Pea Soup Shooter
Pea Shooter
Pea Soup

These were part of the offering at a catering event I did with Regina Mallon Enterprises, food by  Special Attentions .

These were part of the offering at a catering event I did with Regina Mallon Enterprises, food by Special Attentions.

Dates Packed & Wrapped

Boy, does this one get every part of your mouth ready.  It's got salty, sweet, crunch and tang.

Another 3 step method, Slice, stuff and roll.

Another 3 step method, Slice, stuff and roll.

  • Slice open a Meedjol date just enough to remove pit and replace with something better.

  • Stuff it with gorgonzola cheese and a marcona salted almond.

  • Wrap the date with Serrano or Prosciutto ham.

Simple set up of jamón Serrano, gorgonzola, marconas & dates.

Simple set up of jamón Serrano, gorgonzola, marconas & dates.

Just a little slice, yank out the pit and replace with yumminess.

Just a little slice, yank out the pit and replace with yumminess.

Cranked up Caprese Skewers

This is an amped up Caprese salad on a stick.

Ratcheted up a notch by grilling them until they are just warmed then dipped in grated cheese. Oh the melt, the sweet, the salt.

Ratcheted up a notch by grilling them until they are just warmed then dipped in grated cheese. Oh the melt, the sweet, the salt.

Another simple set up with just a few ingredients.

Another simple set up with just a few ingredients.

Once grilled, roll them in grated cheese. Want some heat, sprinkle red pepper flakes, too.

Once grilled, roll them in grated cheese. Want some heat, sprinkle red pepper flakes, too.

  • Skewer a grape tomato, a bocconcino, piece of basil and another grape tomato. (You can certainly serve them as is. But I highly recommend you go the next steps. Also, you can prepare these ahead of time and refrigerate until grilling.)

  • Coat with oil, salt and pepper and lightly grill, then roll in Parmesano Reggiano, and serve immediately.

Chorizo-Manchego-Olive Skewer

A one bite tapa mix that makes a hearty first nibble. 

Warm, cold. Savory, salty, creamy. Need I say more?

Warm, cold. Savory, salty, creamy. Need I say more?

Honestly, I feel like I could create one every week.  The options and ideas are 'to infinity and beyond'.  Just think of little bites that would get your guests ready for more.  Oh la la to the French for their playful amusement.  What a fun game of enticement. 

 
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Pasta with Roasted Butternut Squash Purée - A Recreation

 

 

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So yeah, I have a food and entertaining blog which means I cook a lot.  I also like to experiment, so that keeps me in the kitchen cooking things up. But I fully realize that not everyone has time to dedicate to home cooked meals all the time.  Indeed, it does take time and energy.  For some, making a meal at home can be as much of a treat as going out to dinner.  It just depends on your perspective.  Sometimes going out is the salvation and sometimes vice a versa.  And so it was a couple of weeks ago when I was down visiting my dear friends Emily and Lorne.  Emily had just watched some videos about grilling and she was excited to test drive some ideas. The goal was to grill and fill the dinner table with a variety of selections, from cauliflower to sweet potato slabs to hamburgers.  It was a delicious meal, with the best part being that everyone got involved in either cutting, flipping or tending to the grill. Plus the big treat; eating a healthy, good meal at home. And as any good 'vice versa' goes, the next evening was dinner out. They took the family, and me, for a delicious dinner at restaurant near their home in Maryland.  Two treats; one in, one out, two different ways.

On our restaurant adventure, Emily made a healthy but yummy choice of roasted butternut squash soup and salad. As did Lorne, who ordered a seared scallop dish. The boys had chicken dishes and grilled pizza.  I, on the other hand, went for the full indulgence of a Butternut Squash Pasta dish.  Decadent and delicious is the only way to describe this piece d'resistance.

There were so many layers of earthy flavors in this dish, all co-mingling in luscious harmony. I can still taste it.  So why not try to bring that harmony back.

It was Sunday again. Boy, do the weeks fly by fast.  And Sundays have traditionally signified pasta feasting day. So it goes to stand that was what I would make.  With the taste of that pasta still lingering in my mind and on my palate, I ventured to recreate it for JuanCarlos.   

I do warn you that this dish is going to take a few more steps than my own recipes.  I am usually a firm believer in simple preparation, few but fresh ingredients and not too fussy.  But this pasta was so good that I'm willing to go the extra yards.

The restaurant offered it with bucatini, which I'm sure would have been amazing, but since I am gluten free they served me a spaghetti option fitting that need.  The flavor combos were bold. Spice roasted butternut squash purée as the base. Pasta tossed with pumpkin seed pesto chive oil, wild mushrooms and wilted spinach topped with garlic confit.  Oh, if only I had thought up this medley to take credit. But alas, I did not.  I can only try to figure out what they did and remake to indulge once again.

Here goes.  Stick with me.  It will be worth it.

The line up: Spinach, wild mushrooms, butternut squash, basil, garlic, pumpkin seeds, cinnamon, nutmeg, parmesan cheese, and pasta.

The line up: Spinach, wild mushrooms, butternut squash, basil, garlic, pumpkin seeds, cinnamon, nutmeg, parmesan cheese, and pasta.

Ingredients

For Roasted Butternut Squash
1 butternut squash (8 c cubed), roasted
1/2 t ground cinnamon
1/2 t nutmeg
1/4 c olive oil 

For Garlic Confit
1 head garlic cloves (approx. 11 large cloves)
2/3 c olive oil

For Spinach & Mushrooms
5-6 c wild mushrooms (Cremini, Shiitake, Oyster, Japanese Brown Beech)
8 c baby spinach
Magic 3 (Olive Oil, salt, pepper)

For Pesto
8 c basil leaves, loosely packed
1/2 c pumpkin seeds, roasted (reserve some to garnish)
1/2 c Parmesan cheese
1-2 garlic cloves
1 1/4 c olive oil
salt, pepper to taste
1 lb pasta (I use Tinkyada brown rice linguine)
Parmesan cheese shavings (optional)

Before I embark on instructions. A quick note about multitasking.  I may not highlight this point in each post I write but it's always there.  It's the art of preparing items in a order so that food is cooking, marinating, chilling, etc while you are tackling another task.  This recipe will definitely call for some serious multitasking.

In this recipe there are two parts that will need up to an hour of cooking time.  Those are the roasted butternut squash and the garlic confit.  So we will start there.  (Confit just means poaching in oil slowly, slowly, slowly.  Did I say it takes time? Yes, slowly. And don't let the fancy name freak you out.  This method is beyond super easy.)

Instructions

Peel, remove seeds and cube the butternut squash.  (You can wash and dry the seeds, then roast them for snacking... or toss them out.)

Carefully peel the hard skin off the squash.  I find that a knife works best.

Carefully peel the hard skin off the squash.  I find that a knife works best.

Coat the squash with oil, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg.   Then roast at 400 degrees for 45 min to hour, until very soft and mashable.

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Once you have the butternut squash in the oven, start on the garlic confit.

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Peel garlic cloves and leave whole. In a small saucepan, add garlic and enough olive oil to cover.

Olive oil's golden goodness poured lovingly over garlic cloves.

Olive oil's golden goodness poured lovingly over garlic cloves.

Over low heat, poach for one hour.

While the oven is still on with the squash roasting away, place the pumpkin seeds on a separate baking sheet, roast for 7-10 minutes, or just until lightly toasted.  Set aside to cool.

Pumpkin seeds add great texture to the pesto.

Pumpkin seeds add great texture to the pesto.

The next ingredient to tackle, and in order of length of cooking time is the mushrooms.  Clean and cut them into bite sized pieces.  Sauté them in oil, seasoning with salt and pepper.  The key to cooking mushrooms is not fussing with them.  Once you place them in the pan don't touch them.  Let them get a good sear on them then you can turn them over.  Allow them to cook and get crispy.  

I used a mixture of cremini, shitake, oyster and Japanese Brown Beech mushrooms.  Use whatever ones you like.

I used a mixture of cremini, shitake, oyster and Japanese Brown Beech mushrooms.  Use whatever ones you like.

Put the pasta water up to boil. While the water is going and the mushrooms are cooking move onto making the pesto.

In a food processor, combine basil, pumpkin seeds, garlic and pulse until a fine chop. Then add in parmesan cheese and oil. (The restaurant version called for chive oil, but I didn't feel it was necessary to tack on another item.) Pulse until well blended and season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove and clean the processor, as you will need it to purée the squash.

Pesto goodness in the making.

Pesto goodness in the making.

Once the mushrooms are done, remove and use the same pan to wilt the baby spinach, add a bit of oil to help wilt the leaves.

Spinach just needs to be wilted over low heat.

Spinach just needs to be wilted over low heat.

By this time, the garlic should be done.  The butternut squash should be roasted and ready to purée.  But before that it's time to put the pasta in to cook.  Place the squash cubes in the processor and plus until smooth.  You may need to add some oil if too thick.

Roasted chunks of sweetness

Roasted chunks of sweetness

Roasted Butternut Squash Purée

Roasted Butternut Squash Purée

Now with all the ingredients roasted, sautéd and mixed you are ready to compose the final dish. Drain the pasta and reserve some of the water.

All the work is done.  All the ingredients are ready.

All the work is done.  All the ingredients are ready.

In a bowl combine the pasta and pesto together until coated.  Then mix in the mushrooms, spinach and garlic and gently toss together. Spread the roasted purée on the bottom of each plate and then pile the pasta on top.  Finish with some roasted pumpkin seeds, shaved Parmesan cheese and a drizzle of the garlic oil and a clove or two.

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I know this sounds like more work than my usual recipes.  That's because it's not my recipe.  But honestly, once and while it's nice to spend a bit more time creating a dish that warms your belly and your soul.  It's perfect for a Sunday when you might have a bit more time to spare. And to give you some incentive to take this dish on,  increase the ingredients amount.  Since you are taking the time to make each of these items for this one dish, why not make a bit more and use the extra butternut squash, spinach, mushrooms in dishes for the remainder of week. You can use the squash to make a soup.  Use the spinach and mushrooms to make a frittata or quiche or as side dishes for chicken.  Cook once, eat twice or thrice.

As I mentioned, I use the brown rice pasta for mine but made JC's with regular wheat penne pasta. He really enjoyed this dish but in all fairness, he thought the butternut squash was too sweet for his palate. I thought it gave just the right amount to counter all the other intense flavors.

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Please give this one a try.  I can't take credit for any part of this dish other than tasting it and attempting to recreate it to share with you.  It's nice to share.

 

 

Sent from my iPad

Fresh Ricotta Crostini featuring Summer Toppings

Ricotta crostini topped with the freshest, summer seasonal produce.

Ricotta crostini topped with the freshest, summer seasonal produce.

At the farmers' market this week, one of the new items to scoop up was fresh peas in their pods.  Oh, the excitement and sheer joy of bringing home new seasonal produce. Now, I know this may not be everyone's reaction, but it's fun playing with food.  As per usual though, I didn't have an inkling of what I would make but I knew I had to get me some peas.

Then off to our local organic market I wandered and found pea shoots.  Again, not sure what their destiny would be but had to get them, too. Especially since it felt in keeping with the peas.  I also found French Sourdough bread, which I grabbed in an effort to test how my wheat and yeast sensitivity would fair with this one.

Once I was home, I still didn't have a clue as to what I would do. But just when all hope seemed lost, I thought of ricotta. Whenever in doubt you can always count on cheese as your salvation. With that, I was off to the races with a plan in hand.  I decided that I would celebrate some of the jewels of the season and feature them on crostini.  

Now don't get too excited thinking I'm a genius.  This is not some super "oh my God, what a innovative idea" moment. It's a just a few good pairings that are easy to assemble and even easier to enjoy.  It's summer for Pete's sake.  We all want no brainer food ideas.  This one fits the bill.

Here are the stars of today's show.  
French Sourdough Bread, Fresh Ricotta, Fresh Peas, Pea Shoots, Nectarines, Mint, Tomatoes, Basil

Look at that bounty of summer jewels.

Look at that bounty of summer jewels.

I almost feel silly giving any kind of instructions as this couldn't be easier, and it's pretty self explanatory, but... 
First things first, toast the bread.

You can mix and match at will. One thing remains the same; dollop some the ricotta on each slice and then build each crostini using whichever of these flavor busting seasonal ingredients tickle your fancy to create your perfect crostini. 
Here's what I did.

Pea-Pea Shoot Crostini

  1. Shuck the peas and blanch them. You can also eat them raw. (Can't find fresh, use frozen ones and blanch.)

  2. Top the bread with ricotta.

  3. Add shoots & peas pressing them in.

  4. Sprinkle with coarse sea salt and drizzle with olive oil.

Fresh Tomato-Basil Crostini

  1. While still warm, rub the toasted bread with fresh garlic.

  2. Top with ricotta, fresh slices of tomatoes, basil.

  3. Sprinkle with coarse sea salt and olive oil.

It's as simple as rubbing it on

It's as simple as rubbing it on

Fresh bite of summer

Fresh bite of summer

Roasted Tomato Crostini

  1. Roast grape tomatoes with oil and whole garlic pieces.

  2. Mash the garlic with sea salt, pepper & oil.

  3. Spread the garlic mash on the toast.

  4. Add ricotta, roasted tomatoes, basil and drizzle with tomato juices.

Roasted garlic cloves, sea salt, pepper and olive oil

Roasted garlic cloves, sea salt, pepper and olive oil

Spread as much or as little, but spread this golden goodness.

Spread as much or as little, but spread this golden goodness.

I'm sure you will figure out what to do with all those candy jeweled roasted tomatoes. One idea: make more crostini!

I'm sure you will figure out what to do with all those candy jeweled roasted tomatoes. One idea: make more crostini!

Sweet and savory bite.

Sweet and savory bite.

Nectarine-Mint Crostini

  1. Make a mint simple syrup by heating up equal parts sugar and water with mint leaves until sugar dissolves.

  2. Drizzle the simple syrup on top of the bread.

  3. Top with ricotta, nectarine, minced mint and drizzle some more.

It seriously doesn't get easier than this. These make a wonderful little afternoon snack.  How about a luxurious breakfast treat.  An elegant brunch item. Naturally these are ideal as a party appetizer.
So simple. So fresh.  So seasonal.

These are but a few of the endless variations for crostini. But ones the truly celebrate the summer's seasonal offerings.  Make one. Make them all.  
A few other topping ideas:

  • Sautéed spinach with garlic, oil and red pepper flakes

  • Sautéed broccoli rabe with garlic, oil and shaved Parmesano Reggiano

  • Fresh figs drizzled with honey (you can also add chopped prosciutto)

  • Strawberries, fresh thyme sprinkled with raw sugar

Seriously, it's bread with cheese, top it with whatever floats your boat, and then happy sailing.

When It's Hot... Jump into a Lettuce Boat

I don't know where you live but it's a scorcher right about now in NY.   We've been waiting for summer to really arrive and now it's officially a swamp.  Speaking of weather, I've been under it for some time now. So before this heat wave landed upon us (even though it's summer) I made a ginormous batch of soup.  I have been eating it for days. And since it was a ginormous quantity, I figured I would be enjoying it again and again as well as serving it to my hubby and sister.  But with the thermometer outside soaring damn near human body temp, I don't care how much soup I have left over. Frigging 95 degrees screams for something cooler.

I had some ideas. Well, I always have ideas.  Main one.  Use up the egads amount of tomatoes and basil I bought last week.  It's a fact that I am very easily enticed at the farmer's market by produce's beauty.  But in all fairness,  I bought them in anticipation of hosting guests for a Pizza Sunday Party. Those plans were foiled.  Which left me with more tomatoes and basil than two people can comfortably eat unless forced by some game show stunt. Since last week's basil-ed potatoes went over so well, I made another batch of that sauce and quickly got to figuring out the rest.

The abundance. Don't be fooled. That is only half the tomatoes and 1/3 of the basil I STILL HAVE!! (Plus some went into that ginormous soup. And don't forget to look at that beautiful blue bowl by  Miller Pottery

The abundance. Don't be fooled. That is only half the tomatoes and 1/3 of the basil I STILL HAVE!! (Plus some went into that ginormous soup. And don't forget to look at that beautiful blue bowl by Miller Pottery

I had romaine lettuce.  Perfect as boats to fill with good shit. (The heat made me curse.)
I had zucchini and yellow squash.  
I had hearts of palm and chick peas. Ever present in my pantry.
I had thoughts. (sometimes good; other times, well...)

Zucchini and Yellow Squash cubed.

Zucchini and Yellow Squash cubed.

Even though it was hot out, the zucchini and squash needed to be cooked in my opinion.  Reason: I just really wasn't feeling their raw essence for this dish.  Since it was cleaning day and the house was gleaming, no way was I going to make a mess of the stove.  In the oven went the squashes.  And a few tomatoes whole, too.  I roasted them at 400 degrees until nicely caramelized.

Oiled, salted and peppered for the oven roasting.

Oiled, salted and peppered for the oven roasting.

Everything else, cut up and ready.  I sliced up some more tomatoes raw.  One, because I had a ton, and two because I'm a fan of duality.  Warm tomatoes, cool tomatoes.

Once the  veggies were out of the oven, the only chore that remained; Assembly.  I don't need to hold your hand for this part, do I?  Take your leaf and stuff it with what you love. A little of this and little of that and drizzle some of that banging basil sauce a top.  (Chop up some leftover chicken, or toss in some tuna. Be creative.)

Assembly line. Fill your boats!

Assembly line. Fill your boats!

Light but satisfying.  Cool yet with just enough warmth to make it feel like dinner and not a snack.  Crap, I think I yanked this one out from nowhere, and hit it out of the park.  (The heat made me say that part, too.)  Jill and JC loved them. Yeah, I won't be eating soup.  I got me some leftover lettuce boats to my rescue.

When the weather is too hot to think.  Just jump in a boat and bring along whatever's in your kitchen.